Anodynified

If productivity≤0 then tumblr. Always tumblr.

erin/22/nb/scotland

Ey/em/eir, Xe/xem/xyr or they/them pronouns (still kinda figuring this out)

3DS Friend Code: 0688-5250-4975

Send me a ship and I’ll rate it.

hungry0bookworm:

1sh4dow1:

A+: OTP
A: I love it
B: It’s really cute
C: Not a bad ship
D: I’m neutral on it
E: I don’t really like it
F: NOTP
N/A: I don’t know the ship well enough

Bring it, people. Send me all the ships.

1 hour ago on September 1st, 2014 | J | 18,493 notes

Don’t Call Yourself a Weeabo

magistratemaribelle:

A Guide on the Word “Weeabo”

Hello, you may be wondering why I have the text “If you’re not East Asian and call youself a weeabo, don’t follow me” in my side bar. Here are a few quick disclaimers:

  • I am well aware that many people do it, especially in anime-related and related fandoms. 
  • If you have ever called yourself a weeabo at some point in time that does not mean that you can never follow me or that I will never follow you. I follow people now who do it or have done it in the past, which is part of why this page exists.
  • I am Chinese, not Japanese. I cannot specifically speak about the pain that this causes me from a Japanese standpoint, but because many East Asian experiences with racism overlap, I am still affected by this.

Origins of the Word

The word weeabo comes from a webcomic. It is literally a nonsense word. The word became popularized when people on 4chan were getting upset about being called “wapanese” (wannabe Japanese). The mods put in an auto-censor so the “weeabo” would appear rather than “wapanese.”

Why Do People Call Themselves Weeabos?

I have several explanations/theories.

  • People use this to refer to their past selves when they come to realize that what they were doing was racist and harmful. This usage is okay as long as you realize that you may mess up in the future and are willing to correct that too!
  • East Asian people use this word to joke about their experiences and joke about weeabos. This is an okay usage as long as they are doing this for catharsis! If there are other issues about East Asian people doing this, it’s an inter-community discussion.
  • People do not understand the origins of this word and mistakenly believe it means that they are into anime/manga rather than being connected to a fetishist viewpoint of Japan.
  • People do not understand that anti-racists use this word to call out fetishists.

What is a Weeabo?

A weeabo is somebody who fetishizes Japanese culture, but it may not be limited to that. A weeabo also may conflate multiple groups of Asian people, randomly start speaking Japanese at anyone that might look Japanese, put down non-Japanese Asian people for being the “wrong type of Asian,” and even promote imperialism because of their inaccurate viewpoint of Japan!

Why Non-East Asian People Should Not Call Themselves Weeabos

  • Weeabo is a term that Japanese people and other East Asians use to describe those who do them harm due to fetishized viewpoints.
  • It is a term that people use in solidarity with Japanese/East Asian people to recognize this specific harmful behavior. When you are against fetishization/racism/oppression, and you claim to be this word, you are stripping it of the meaning that we assign to classify people who are harmful to us.
  • To be clear, you are not specifically appropriating Japanese by doing this, but you are undermining East Asian people who try to steer clear of harm. I have experienced a lot of cognitive dissonance about what I will encounter since creating this blog.

What Is Really Wrong with Being a Weeabo?

  • The amount of harm done varies, so I will speak from my own lived experience.
  • I live in a 99% white area, but in a place with a lot of weeabos. People will get unfriendly fast where I live and have grown up; if you are not their complacent Asian fantasy when you are around them.
  • When my school had a Chinese teacher teach Mandarin, the children bullied her so ruthlessly that she quit halfway through the year. Some of the white kids were angry that the district did not bring in Japanese and showed it (though I doubt a Japanese teacher would have been treated any better). This environment was very alienating and made it hard for nonwhite (especially East Asian students) to speak up to all the white kids.
  • Weeabos’ fetishized viewpoints of Japan can be very misogynistic specifically and build up a fantasy idea of what Asian women are like, “submissive, docile, etc.” and cause them to sexualize people on basis of being Asian. This has caused a great deal of harm to my education personally for speaking out against injustice because I am expected to be docile, and I have developed retroactive ways of coping with attention I do not want pulled to my ethnicity.
  • Weeabos can influence people into thinking they are the “wrong kind of Asian” with a strange policing of someone’s Asianness that centers on whether or not they are Japanese.
  • Weeabos will thoughtlessly call people inappropriate and alienating things for wearing their traditional clothing because it is vaguely Asian and start fawning over it because they think it’s Just So Cool That You’re Asian. This may or may not wear off if you are a different type of Asian than Japanese. Either way it can be humiliating or uncomfortable.
  • Weeabos don’t understand how painful it is to be ostracized for not blending enough and trying to connect to your cultural roots and will act like it is the same thing when Japanese people speak up about appropriation.
  • Weeaboos have also defended Japanese imperialism and neofascism, nationalism etc. without any idea of the context and get upset when people who have heritage connected to the countries hurt by this call them out.

If you read this list and thought that you would never do any of that, maybe it is time to stop calling yourself a weeabo and evaluate your behavior. I am not insinuating that you are doing these things by listing them. I am saying that these are some of the things weeabos do. Even if they are being less violently harmful than harrassing, they still buy into and perpetuate a larger culture of fetishization. These are the type of people that I, and other East Asians who speak about racism talk about when we refer to weeabos.

If you are in anime/manga or related fandoms and this is the first you have heard weeabo used in a negative manner regarding fetishism, I strongly suggest that you do some reading. If you want referrals, I am happy to provide them. Just ask me privately because I am not comfortable setting racist anons on blogs that already deal with enough vitriol.

3 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 | J | 1,958 notes

Send me a ship and I’ll rate it.

meowgon:

hungry0bookworm:

1sh4dow1:

A+: OTP
A: I love it
B: It’s really cute
C: Not a bad ship
D: I’m neutral on it
E: I don’t really like it
F: NOTP
N/A: I don’t know the ship well enough

Bring it, people. Send me all the ships.

do this i am running on four hours sleep and need to crush some dreams

5 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 | J | 18,493 notes

thorsty:

She’s gorgeous… She’s beautiful. That beauty mark near her mouth is sexy… Absolutely beautiful.

-Yachi about Kiyoko (x)

8 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 | J | 798 notes

themouseabides:

Knowledge is knowing that Frankenstein is not the monster.

Wisdom is knowing that Frankenstein is the monster.

10 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 | J | 195,264 notes

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

-

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

16 hours ago on August 31st, 2014 | J | 30,316 notes

総北、箱学、京伏ろぐ   |   by 山崎

17 hours ago on August 31st, 2014 | J | 253 notes
Tagged as: #yowapeda 

leronde:

me looking at a character i love: look at this piece of shit fuckwad asshole. someone just punch him in the fucking face. terrible. disgusting. illegal trash. utter garbage. i want to strangle him. fuck him lmao FUCK HIM.

someone: That character is terrible.

me: 

image

18 hours ago on August 31st, 2014 | J | 84,887 notes

ask me my top six anything

21 hours ago on August 31st, 2014 | J | 54,842 notes

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Saturday morning, over 1,000 people march for justice for Michael Brown. 

August 30th.

21 hours ago on August 31st, 2014 | J | 35,670 notes
Tagged as: #ferguson